Chapter One, Page One

Since last you heard from me, I was in the midst of NaNoWriMo. Between then and now, I got back to my life, while still devoting a few nights a week to finishing that book , which I did in early March. Solomon’s Key (working title) finished up just north of 110,000 words, and while I felt kind of disappointed with it, but I did finish. Perhaps next year I’ll read it and consider if it’s worth salvaging.

That was all just prelude to what I was really looking forward to doing: editing the previous year’s project, “Automaton”. The first thing I did was to run spell-check, which I had turned completely off while I was writing. I don’t mind telling the world that I’m a bad typist (there are likely typos lurking in this very blog post), but sweet zombie Jesus did checking 120,000 words take a while! Three evenings of constant clicking and looking up words to make sure I was choosing the right homonym or puzzling over an odd series of transposed and accidentally doubled letters. And don’t get me started on trying to find words that I thought I knew how to spell, but which didn’t show up in any of the dictionaries I searched through. I can’t for the life of me remember what that word is, so I guess I’m doomed to misspell it again, but I do remember that it started with an unexpected letter. Maybe.

But enough about spell checking! The big thing I did recently is to print out the entire 120,000 word manuscript. On paper. Like it’s 1985, all over again! Yeah, baby, yeah!

As a standard manuscript format (double-spaced, 12-point font), it ran about 561 pages, which I printed front-and-back. It still comes out to be a huge stack of paper.

Manuscript

I can't believe I wrote the whole thing.

I didn’t just do this to see how many trees I could kill – I did it at the behest of Holly Lisle. See, the other major step I took toward learning to write was to finally enroll in Holly Lisle’s “How to Revise Your Novel” on-line course. Lesson 1: Read through the entire manuscript, making notes about specific passages and how they failed in the categories of world building, character development, reader interest, etc….  She has a whole system for noting down your observations in one place with only a minimal cross-reference mark in the manuscript itself. I’ll be doing this for the next 561 pages; so far, I’ve done 3.

Her system appeals to me, though I am only seeing the tip of the iceberg. I feel like Daniel, washing Mr. Miyagi’s cars and sanding his decks, though I’m not about to throw a tantrum (I am only 3 pages in, after all), nor am I being bullied by karate hooligans.

Since I’m only just getting started, I can’t judge how successful it’s going to make my editing process, but I’m sure I’ll learn a huge amount over the course of the next several months. Check back over the next few months as my understanding of HtRYN grows. I’m sure this is going to be helpful though. I love me some organizational tools and methods. This you will no doubt learn as you read my future blog entries.

Looking at that stack of paper, I feel odd abandoning my beloved Scrivener during the editing process; it was designed to be an excellent tool for that purpose, and I’ve been looking forward to using more of it’s potential. But instead of ignoring the directions of my instructor, I’m going to be good and follow instructions. Hardly anything of the process has been revealed to me, and until I’ve been through it all, there’s no point in wasting brain power trying to supplant the tools I’m supposed to use with the one I want to use.

Once I’m done with the course, I’m sure I’ll already have adapted the system to Scrivener, and will be ready to use my new skills in combination with the best electronic tool for writers since the word processor.

Until then, I hope to keep you appraised of my progress.

Wish me luck.

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